us_roads

The map above depicts major U.S. highways connecting the various metabolic hubs.

canada

This map depicts major roadways in Canada.

Larger maps can be seen at: http://www.ecoclimax.com/2016/09/the-us-mapped-only-by-roads-highways.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

I’m always amazed at the speed and infiltration of this vascular system into the organic tissues of new geographic areas. There are very few areas that these tiny distribution channels have not penetrated. They’re built to access the resource gradients found there. After the road is built, typically a few frontier technological cells will be built; homes, storage buildings, barns and then the technological enzymes (tractors, chainsaws, cultivators, rifles) will pour forth onto the fresh, nutrient rich area and begin the harvest. Raw material is pulled into the technological, cellular system where it can be distributed along these myriad roadways to other cells involved in the overall metabolism.

Although I like to compare man’s escapades to a cancerous growth due to the relatively sudden evolution to technological, systematic status, the growth that has resulted has gone far beyond that of a common malignancy. If even 1/100 of the scope of growth we see on the geographic landscape had occurred in a multicellular organism, it would have already expired and taken the cancer with it into the great beyond. But as you can see from the maps above, the “cancer” has sent a vascular distribution channel (road) into just about every tissue that has anything to offer. It’s as if a distribution system similar to that of multicelluar organisms comprised of a heart/pump, major arteries, lesser arteries and capillaries had grown into another body for the sole purpose removing all nutrients for its own metabolic activity. It’s as if a human cancer had produced not just a few tumors that interfere with the indispensable functioning of the integrated body, but rather that the exponentially growing cells had penetrated every last cubic millimeter of flesh without the patient yet expiring.

The maps above only show the major roadways. Spreading out from these major arteries in every direction are the capillaries that leave no stone unturned in their search for resources to pull into the cancerous growth. The entire ecosystem is being eaten alive by the digestive juices pouring from the technological cells.

And what do the politicians promise their citizens? More growth. It’s even a principle of the cancer to build more roads to spur more growth (bring more resources into the cancer.) And what can anyone find sustainable about this malignant operation? Do humans think that they will be able to pour more enzyme onto the landscape? New and improved enzyme to extract every last bit of resource? What is sustainable when the human and associated technological conduits burn through everything they can access while dumping the CO2 into the atmosphere and dumping the other toxic wastes willy-nilly into the bodily environment. The ecosystem is dying and all the idiots in Washington and other capitals can say is that we need more growth. Even after the ecosystem is dead, the human cancer will likely continue processing necrotic tissue until it too ceases to function in the exhausted, putrid environment.

This entire civilization is a one-trick pony and the show is almost over. Look again at the maps and the complex, metabolic hubs (cities) sucking the life from the landscape with its tiny capillary roads and try to imagine just how sustainable any of that really is. It’s not.

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Farm land, where the cancer systematically deploys tools to utilize the soil and fresh water gradients. Most raw materials are then taken into the vascular system for transport to factories for conversion into techno-mass.

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Infiltration of cancerous cells and vascular system into ecosystem tissues. Each cell houses RNA, of which some will remain in the home cells while others travel to dedicated factory or office cells to do the business of the cancer, finding new gradients and opportunities for growth, production of tools, production of more cells and roads.